2014 NCAA Tournaments’s Top 5 Betting Liabilities

2014 NCAA Tournaments's Top 5 Betting Liabilities

2014 NCAA Tournaments’s Top 5 Betting Liabilities

When it comes to providing ‘drama’ some players make their on the court while others seemingly insist on making their off the hardwood. Then, there are others like Oklahoma State point guard Marcus Smart, a gifted, do-it-all floor leader that makes headlines both on the court and off.

As the 2014 NCAA Basketball Tournament approaches, smart heads up this fun-filled list of the top five players that college hoops fans can expect to cause their more than their fair share of drama once March Madness gets underway in earnest later this month.

2014 NCAA Tournaments’s Top 5 Betting Liabilities

Julius Randle – Freshman Forward – Kentucky

Kentucky ‘s 6-foot-9, 250-pound power forward is an absolute monster that will almost assuredly be one of the top five players selected in this summer’s NBA draft. Not only does Randle average an impressive 15.5 points and 10.4 rebounds per game, but the bruising big man is as athletic as they come at his size – and exceptionally ornery. Randle plays with a chip on his shoulder that often times, has his opponent fearful before the first jump-ball is ever tossed. The bad news surrounding Randle is the fact that he’s attempted eight shots or less in four of his last five games in Kentucky ‘s directionless offense.

Andrew Wiggins – Freshman Forward – Kansas

Prior to his freshman season, the supremely athletic 6-foot-8, 200-pound Wiggins was being touted as the consensus overall No. 1 pick and a future LeBron James-like player. While he hasn’t totally dispelled those beliefs with horrific play this season, it’s also quite clear that this young phenom still has a lot to learn. While Wiggins averages a multifaceted 16.3 points, 5.9 rebounds and 1.6 assists per game, Wiggins has also shown a propensity for not being very aggressive and disappearing through long stretches of games. Sill, all eyes will be on this high-flying freshman once Kansas begins its perennial March Madness quest.

Doug McDermott – Senior Forward – Creighton

The sweet-shooting 6-foot-8, 225-pound senior may be the best player in all of college basketball as the potential NBA lottery pick does it all for underrated Creighton. Not only does McDermott average a stellar 26.0 points and 7.0 rebounds per contest, but he has put up big numbers against every team he has played against, thereby dismissing that ‘he plays in a weak conference’ theory. McDermott has never shot less than 52.0 percent from the field or 40.5 percent from three-point distance in any of his four seasons. Make no mistake about it college hoops betting enthusiasts…Doug McDermott is as big a star as there is in all of college basketball and the kind of player than can shoot holes in any teams postseason hopes.

Jabari Parker – Freshman Forward – Duke

While Parker entered this season with far less fanfare than the aforementioned Wiggins, I believe at this stage of their respective careers, it’s clear that Parker is the better – and far more aggressive player – at both ends of the floor. Not only does Parker average an eye-opening 18.8 points and 8.9 rebounds per game, but more importantly, he is the heart and soul of a Duke Blue Devils team that feeds off of his confidence. Parker can put the ball in the basket from in the post or from long range equally well, making him arguably the toughest player in the country to guard today. As Parker goes, so will the Blue Devils March Madness hopes.

Marcus Smart – Sophomore Guard – Oklahoma State

Oklahoma State ‘s 6foot-4, 220 pound sophomore point guard could very well e the best player in the country, though he often doesn’t get the respect he deserves because of his on and off-court antics. Still, Smart could very well be the most prolific drama-maker once March Madness rolls around with his explosive games and ability to makes plays from all over the court. Not only does Smart average 17.6 points per game, but the multifaceted floor leader also grabs 5.7 rebounds per game while dishing out 4.7 assists. Love him or loathe him, one thing’s for sure college basketball fans, you can bet on Smart to make as much drama as any player in the country that will compete in the annual March Madness tournament.